Seminar Programme

The Institute of Historical Research at the School of Advanced Studies of the University of London hosts our seminar on Collecting & Display. The monthly seminars take place at the Institute, Senate House, Malet St, London WC1E 7HU. Seminars begin at 6.00 and last approximately one hour. 

PLEASE SEE THE CONFERENCES PAGE FOR RECENT UPDATES AND CALL FOR PAPERS


PLEASE NOTE THAT IF YOU HAVE NOT BEEN RECEIVING EMAILS FROM US YOU SHOULD CHECK THAT YOU HAVE GIVEN US YOUR UP TO DATE ADDRESS AND MAKE SURE THAT THE EMAILS ARE NOT GOING STRAIGHT TO SPAM.   IF YOU ARE HAVING DIFFICULTIES, PLEASE CONTACT collecting_display@hotmail.com

The Society for the History of Collecting has recently been formed to encourage communication among scholars in the field through its website https://societyhistorycollecting.wordpress.com and events.  The international forum Collecting and Display  will continue its activities, holding monthly seminars, organising conferences and publishing.  The two organisations are intended to be complementary.  To contact the Society please see its website or email  sochistcoll@gmail.com.

LONDON

2018                    PLEASE NOTE THAT EXCEPTIONALLY DURING THIS TERM OUR SEMINARS WILL BE ON TUESDAYS

NEXT SEMINAR:   

TUESDAY, 11th December 6 p.m.

Collecting Histories Forum: New Research from Emerging Scholars

For the final session of the Collecting and Display seminars in 2018, we are collaborating with the Society for the History of Collecting to present new research by three members.  Each will give a short paper so that there will be time for questions and discussion.   We are most grateful for the support for this event provided by the Worshipful Company of Playing Card Makers.

Collecting sources: Antonio Francesco Ghiselli (1634-1730) and his Memorie Manoscritte

Guido Beduschi, PhD candidate, Corpus Christi College, University of Cambridge, 

Antonio Francesco Ghiselli left 88 volumes of manuscript memoires to posterity: the Memorie Antiche Manoscritte di Bologna. The Memorie’s volumes of modern history, concerning events contemporary with Ghiselli’s life, are rich in manuscript and printed ephemera as well as other material (such as leaflets, newssheets, edicts, popular prints and engravings), which were collected by the author and glued into the pages of his book – and which would have, otherwise, hardly survived. In this talk, Guido Beduschi will look at some of this rare material, at how and why they were collected by Ghiselli, and the function they had in his historical work. Finally, he will consider the collectable value of Ghiselli’s memoirs themselves in the manuscript book market, during the earlier part of the eighteenth century.

Icons of Renaissance taste in Vulcan’s Foundry. Plaster and bronze casts from Florence to England (1830-1860).

Giuseppe Rizzo, Ph.D student Karl-Ruppert, Heidelberg University

In the first half of the nineteenth century  reproductions of the some of the most representative statues of fifteenth and sixteenth century ‘Renaissance’ art came to England from Florence. They soon became icons in the new Victorian taste. How, when and why did copies of statues of ‘the Renaissance’ come to England? What was the process through which they became so influential? To answer these questions, the talk examines the interaction between the production of statuary copies in the artist workshops of Florence and the collecting interests of wealthy British "grand tourists". It studies the gradual evolution of taste towards Italian Renaissance art and the effects of defining its visual images within and outside Tuscany after the 1830s. This interaction is exemplified by the patronage of the 2nd Duke and Duchess of Sutherland, who, through their wealth and closeness to Queen Victoria, were influential representatives of the British aristocracy.

The Ouseley Manuscripts: A History

Nayra Zaghloul, Worcester College, University of Oxford

This talk will present a biographical outline of Sir Gore and Sir William Ouseley’s lives and their academic specialisations in order to stimulate discussion on how‘qualified’ they were to valuate, collect and write about Islamic manuscripts on the scale they did. It will compare the contents and structure of the Ouseley manuscript collection to other nineteenth century private and public collections and discuss its current position within the wider collection of the Bodleian Library’s Islamic holdings. Nayra will trace the journey the brothers took through Iran on their joint diplomatic tour with mention of the Persian manuscripts acquired on their travels in India. It will present, in greater codicological detail, a selection of the manuscripts to identify links between the Ouseley’s scholarly interests and the items in their collections and to show key features that characterise a manuscript once owned by the brothers, such as, signatures, coats of arms, typical bindings and other signs of previous ownership or sale. These narratives will shed light on the nature of ‘Oriental’ manuscript collecting in nineteenth century England.

Nayra Zaghloul is a postgraduate student in Islamic Art and Archaeology at the Khalili Research Centre, University of Oxford funded by the Barakat Trust. Her research interests include the history of collecting, Persian and Arabic manuscripts, cosmopolitanism, photography, jewellery, Arab painting in the 20th century and Middle Eastern literature. She is based between London, Oxford and Cairo and works as a freelance cataloguer and collection adviser for private collectors, museums, galleries and dealers across the world. She can be reached at nayra.zaghloul@gmail.com or you can follow her work at www.instagram.com/nayrazag/

FORTHCOMING DATES IN 2019:  details to be announced

Monday 7th January

Monday, 4th February

Monday, 4th March

Monday 13th May










The Institute of Historical Research, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU